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I do not usually promote events but this is one that I feel passionate about: Justice and safeguarding our precious right to freedom.   Too often we ignore the risks and here we have an expert, the esteemed Lord Phillips, helping to shine some light into the murky world of national security versus the citizen: unmissable.

Free lecture at Kings College, London

Lord Phillips will discuss a practice recently introduced into English procedure in relation to “closed material”. This is a controversial practice under which one party, usually the State, puts before the Court evidence of a sensitive nature that is concealed from both the public, and the other party. Initially Parliament introduced this practice in a number of areas of public law where sensitive evidence is likely to be important. For example, closed material can be placed before the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC), which handles appeals in immigration or deportation cases where evidence is involved whose disclosure would often involve a threat to national security.

Lord Phillips will describe how this practice has fared at the hands of the English Courts and the Court of Human Rights at Strasbourg. Parliament recently extended the use of closed material to civil proceedings. This controversial measure was the subject of vigorous debate in both the Lords and the Commons and Lord Phillips, having taken part in some of that debate, will comment on it.

Location Edmond J Safra Lecture TheatreWhen 30/09/2013 (18:30-20:30)

To sign up for the lecture please follow this link

About the The Right Honourable, The Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers KG, PC


Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers is the first Dickson Poon Distinguished Fellow and Visiting Professor in The Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London. He joined the School in November 2012 following his retirement  as the first President of the UK Supreme Court, an appointment that he took up in 2009. Prior to this role he served as Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales from 2005 until 2008 and was Master of the Rolls from 2000 to 2005.

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